ANZOS

About ANZOS

The Australian and New Zealand Obesity Society (formally known as the Australasian Society for the Study of Obesity or ASSO) was established in 1991.

It is a scientific organisation of medical practitioners, dietitians, scientists and other health care professionals interested orcp journalin obesity research, treatment or public health initiatives directed at the prevention of obesity.

The Society has over 250 members throughout Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Region.

The operation of ANZOS is based on the work of an elected Council, Executive Group, Sub-committees and Secretariat.

An elected Council has overall responsibility for the direction of ANZOS activities, while a four-strong Executive Group deals with ANZOS business on a regular basis. A series of sub-committees provide expert advice and input to the Council on specific areas of ANZOS action including clinical issues, education and training, public health, and liaison with other professional groups.

A Secretariat for ANZOS has been established in Sydney to assist Council to further develop ANZOS and to promote the improved management and prevention of obesity. The Secretariat will interact with other relevant national bodies and will work closely with the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) in the Western Pacific to assist with the implementation of the Society’s objectives around increased research activity.

The Society is a full member of the International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO), which gives a combined representation to over 11,000 professionals in over 50 national obesity associations throughout the world.

In 2010, Obesity Research and Clinical Practicebecame the official Journal of ANZOS.

Mission and Objectives

The Mission of the Society is to provide a forum that supports and encourages the improved management and prevention of obesity in Australia and New Zealand through increased awareness and understanding of obesity, improved research on obesity issues and the identification of improved management and prevention practices.

The society has six specific objectives on matters relating to overweight and obesity within Australia and New Zealand to:

  • Ensure active communication with and between members of the society;
  • Promote interaction between different disciplines/perspectives on obesity and provide an independent and authoritative voice that represents the broad multi-disciplinary membership;
  • Be actively involved in policy development;
  • Promote an improved public understanding;
  • Promote an improved professional understanding; and
  • Promote, facilitate research and nurture young researchers.

ANZOS Operations

The operation of ANZOS is based on the work of an elected Council, Executive Group, Sub-committees and Secretariat.

An elected Council has overall responsibility for the direction of ANZOS activities, while a four-strong Executive Group deals with ANZOS business on a regular basis. A series of sub-committees provide expert advice and input to the Council on specific areas of ANZOS action including clinical issues, education and training, public health, and liaison with other professional groups.

A Secretariat for ANZOS has been established in Sydney to assist Council to further develop ANZOS and to promote the improved management and prevention of obesity. The Secretariat will interact with other relevant national bodies and will work closely with the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) in the Western Pacific to assist with the implementation of the Society’s objectives around increased research activity.

ANZOS Funding

Work and projects conducted by ANZOS are funded by donation, financial support, members’ subscriptions and sponsorship.

Council members and ANZOS sub-committee members receive no remuneration for their work on behalf of ANZOS, and a large proportion of the operating costs for the ANZOS is derived from members’ subscriptions. The work of the Secretariat and the large-scale national projects conducted by ANZOS are funded by donation. Donations are accepted as educational or research grants and all financial contributions are subject to defined regulations and audit procedures. Financial support is solicited from a variety of health, community, government and commercial organisations.